Veröffentlichungen von Udo Wild

Konferenz-Artikel (Peer Reviewed)

Wild, U., Laumer, S., and Krönke, A.H. (2012)
The Bipartite Influence of Information Overload on User Resistance to Knowledge Management Systems
Proceedings of the 18th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Seattle (WA)

View Abstract
This research centers on the relationship between information overload as an aspect of information quality on the one side, and, on the other side, user resistance to knowledge management systems as an aspect of an individual's decision process. While discussing this relationship theoretically we propose a bipartite influence of information overload as on the one hand it fosters acceptance of these system, but on the other hand also causes user resistance. By analyzing information overload in pre- and post-implementation phases of knowledge management systems we argue that information overload has an ambivalent causal effect as it can act both positively and negatively in relation to the point of time overload occurs or is expected. Therefore, based on existing literature we propose a research model and illustrate the relationships through results of a case study.

Wild, U. and Laumer, S. (2011)
Failure and Success of Knowledge Management Systems in the Financial Services Industry
Proceedings of the 2011 Quality Information in Organizations and Society (Pre ICIS siglQ Workshop), Shanghai, China
(Research in Progress)

View Abstract
The success of information systems (IS) and especially knowledge management systems (KMS) is defined through the acceptance and usage of them. Directly after the implementation the initial success of such systems start with a relatively good acceptance and usage. When the first hype is over the problems of the systems become evident and the acceptance and usage dwindles. But what kinds of problems lead to the decreasing acceptance and finally to the rejection of the system? Our research in progress approach is intended to investigate those reasons for changes in the beliefs, attitudes and satisfaction of KMS users. Therefore one longitudinal case study is conducted in the financial service industry. The main objective is to elucidate inhibitors and enablers of KMS usage over time. The first period of investigation will be conducted before the implementation of a new KMS replacing an old one implemented in 1999 which has been identified as a major research of a declining job satisfaction within the organization observed. The second period of investigation is directly after the implementation and the third one after at least six months. Within our research-in-progress article we describe the theoretical background and research setting of our approach and present first results of the first data collection period.

Wild, U. and Laumer, S. (2011)
Adopting Business Processes - Distinguishing Characteristics of Business Processes and the Role of Standardization
Proceedings of the 2011 IFIP 8.2/Organizations and Society in Information Systems (OASIS) (Pre-ICIS Workshop), Shanghai, China
(Research in Progress)

View Abstract
Venkatesh (2006) prescribed in his article some research scenarios which are very interesting to follow. Although about five years have elapsed little has been done to follow his suggestions to dig deeper into the processes' characteristics and their impact on employees' adoption and the overall individual adoption of business processes and business process standards. We also think that this is a worthy field of study to follow. We want to pursue four steps to better understand the adoption of processes and possible process standards. First of all we need to find out process characteristics that are relevant to and perceived by the users and therefore have influence on their daily use. First steps towards this work have been done by Volkoff et al. (2007) and Orlikowski and Scott (2008) who come from the field of organizational science and throw a specific view onto that topic. The drivers to adopt IT have been widely investigated (only to mention one: Venkatesh et al. 2003). We do not want to further investigate this field. Instead we want to investigate the adoption of business processes. As business processes are almost entirely supported by IT systems and the users are even lead through the process via workflow systems, it is hard to distinguish whether the users adopt the IT or process. We think that it is very important to delineate IT and process characteristics that influence their adoption (second step). As a third step we want to show empirically the impact of the characteristics of processes on their adoption. Additionally, standardization of business processes can prove profitable (Münstermann et al. 2010). But the role of standardization in the adoption of business processes is not quite clear yet. One can imagine that it is a mediator between the process characteristics and the adoption of business processes. We want to investigate this topic further in order to clarify the interrelationship between business processes, business process standardization and the adoption of business processes (fourth step). First, we will conduct an exploratory case study in a large company in the financial services industry to find out characteristics of processes that influence the workers daily tasks. In addition to the elucidation of those characteristics we want to delineate constructs and relations of IT and process adoption. This company introduced a new core banking system in 2008 and is currently but slowly changing its processes towards already developed process standards. This allows us to find out the role of business process standardization in the adoption of processes in a situation of process change. Therefore the case is a good opportunity to answer some of the related research questions and allows us to gain further deep insights into the above mentioned interrelationship. Additionally, a survey is planned in the financial services industry to empower and verify the findings of the case study.

Wirtky, T., Eckhardt, A., Laumer, S., Wild, U., and Weitzel, T. (2011)
Going beyond operational efficiency in HR using IT - A Literature Review of Human Resources Information Systems
Proceedings of the 17th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Detroit (MI)

View Abstract
Leading academics claim that the management of human resources will be most critical in gaining competitive advantage. Today, the human resources departments (HR) are transforming themselves from an administrative cost-center to an internal partner delivering additional business value. In this transformation process, information technology (IT) could play a key role. Therefore, this paper aims to unfold both the current state of knowledge concerning the value contribution of information systems (IS) for the HR function and approaches that go even beyond operational efficiency. Reviewing nearly 8,000 articles, published in the proceedings of eight major IS conferences reveals that in total 35 articles exclusively deal with the topic of human resources information systems (HRIS) but only very few research approaches show, how HRIS could help to go beyond operational efficiency. Furthermore, the literature analysis identifies that approaches dealing with the IT support for HR planning processes are completely missing so far.

von Stetten, A., Wild, U., and Chrennikow, W. (2011)
Adopting Social Network Sites - The Role of Individual IT Culture and Privacy Concerns
Proceedings of the 17th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Detroit (MI)
Best Paper Nomination

View Abstract
In this paper we examine the role of the concepts of Individual IT Culture (IITC) and Privacy Concerns in IT adoption using the example of the social network site (SNS) Facebook. Analyzing data from a large online survey with Partial Least Squares (PLS), we show that IITC is an antecedent for Privacy Concerns and the TAM sub-constructs Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU) and Perceived Usefulness (PU). However, contrary to our hypothesis, Privacy Concerns do not have a significant negative effect on the Intention to Use Facebook. The remaining relationships in the TAM (PEOU --> PU; PEOU --> Intention; PU --> Intention, Intention --> Usage) are confirmed. Besides, we contribute to better validate the assessment instrument for IITC as we show by means of a reflective first-order formative second-order construct that six sub-constructs of IITC do have a significant influence on IITC whereas one sub-construct does not.